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Penguin Books

 

My favorite animal is the penguin, so it should come as no surprise to you that as a girl, one of my all-time favorite books was Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater. Originally published in 1938 the Newbery Honor Award winning book spoke to me as a child because who would not want to live with a flock of penguins? It also spoke to me because of the reality it conveyed. Mr. Popper’s Penguins showed that living with penguins would be hard and there are lots of challenges to face. So it helped me understand that while living with a live penguin would be cool, it certainly would not be perfect. In 2012, thoughts of my childhood fondness for Mr. Popper’s Penguins returned when I read the Caldecott Honor award winning picture book One Cool Friend by Toni Buzzeo and illustrated by David Small. The book’s main character, Elliot, also dreams of owning a penguin. And when his father expectedly agrees, Elliot finds out just what living with a penguin is like. I love this book because it adds on a wonderful theme about making friends that I had never found in Mr. Popper’s Penguins, but at the same time, made me want to go back and read an old favorite. This experience underscores one of the things I believe about literature, and that is, books make connections. Connections happen between a book and their reader as we see our own experiences in the pages we read. Connections also happen between books—just as they did for me with these two penguin books. And books can even make strong connections to the world around us as we see events and themes playing out in the real world. For me, the reality that literature does not exist as a single entity but connects to us, itself, and the world, is one of the things that makes books and reading richer. This reality is also an important key to know. Because I have found as a teacher and avid book recommender, one of the best ways to find a book that will make a great fit for a reader is to see how it connects to them, their reading, and their world. Maybe next time you’re looking for a great book for one of your readers, you’ll take a tip from Worlds Awaiting and will look a little closer at book connections.


By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING

 

Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater, illustrated by Robert Lawson. Little, Brown Young Readers, 1938.

 

One Cool Friend by Toni Buzzeo, illustrated by David Small.  Dial Books, 2012.

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.


Book Apps


One thing is very certain -- technology and how we use it today has expanded the concept of what a “book” is. A book certainly no longer needs to be printed on paper, but it can apply to technology in exciting and interesting ways. One of these applications that I love to follow are book to app transitions. This category is essentially a book or book character that has been recreated into an app.  Sometimes these apps just take the book and put it in an app, making it more of an e-book. Sometimes app creators take the book a step further and add magical things that print books can’t do, thus making the book interactive. Some apps just take the character or premise of a book and make a whole new application. 


No matter the form, these apps are exciting and take books to a whole new level. Now don’t get me wrong, not all apps are created equal and some of these are big misses. And, in all honesty, sometimes you just have to try them to see if they offer the kind of experience you want. Also, the reality is that most of the really great ones cost a little money, so you have to spend a bit to get them. But, in the end, there are those that are worth it. 


My personal recommendations are Sandra Boynton’s book apps. Boynton is an amazing artist who is well known for her outstanding board books. She has taken four of her classic books and put the stories into apps. The apps recreate the book experience with a two-page spread where the user has to turn the page. And, they include fun interactive elements where the characters move or items are added. All the interactives fit really well with the story and make sense for what is going on. So, there is another nice layer to the story without being distracting. Boynton’s books also include narration so the book can be read for you or you can read it yourself. Add in some subtle music and you have created a fun interactive app that is right for the kind of kids who love her board books. So, if you are like us here on Worlds Awaiting and you also like to look for new kinds of books, maybe it’s time to check out the apps on your phone or tablet to see what kinds of new reading experiences await you.

 

By Rachel Wadham, Host of Worlds Awaiting


Check out Sandra Boyton’s apps here:

http://www.sandraboynton.com/sboynton/Going-to-Bed-App.html

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.



It Doesn't Take Much

By Sam Payne


It’s remarkable how little coaxing a memory needs before it floods your brain as a full-fledged story – bringing back to you a living, breathing part of your life that may have retreated to a foggy corner of the past.

 

Not too many days ago, Dr. Eric Eliason sent a handful of his students to the Apple Seed studios to tell personal stories for each other in front of our microphones. Dr. Eliason teaches a folklore class at Brigham Young University, and has brought classes to the studio before. It’s one of our favorite things to do, gathering, archiving, and broadcasting stories from students at the University, and we always look forward to visits from people who haven’t had that experience before. They tend to enter the studio as classmates, and leave as kin. 

 

Midway through the sharing, we heard a story from Mikaylie Hebbert about her grandfather, who, on a family picnic, brought a long, metal wrench, with which he swatted a bear on the nose as the bear got too curious (As Mikaylie told her story, I had no idea that she’s the daughter-in-law of Mary Ann Maxwell Hebbert, an old family friend. This is one small world). Like lightning, my brain went to the story of my own grandfather, who, on a mountain drive with his kids (among them my father), saw a deer out the car window. He stopped the car, rolled down the window, and said “C’mere, Deer,” upon which the deer walked obediently over to the car. This was my grandfather who used to take business trips from California to Utah, and when he returned home would hand over souvenir tortoises he’d wrangled off the desert. These things happened a generation before me, of course, but important family stories were comprised of them. I haven’t thought of these things in years. And then, whoosh. As Mikaylie told her story, back they came, with very little bidding.

 

From Left: Sam (holding the family goat, "JB"); Sam's brother, Joe (holding his cat, "Tiger"); and Sam's brother, David. Behind: Sam's grandfather, Leland Jay Payne.


Flash forward to last night. I pulled into the driveway after a long day and yanked the mail from the box as I went in the door. There was only one piece of mail; a circular from Mason Shoes, founded in 1904 by a German immigrant named August Mason and his son, Bert.  The Masons cut their teeth as shoe manufacturers by hand-making boots and shoes for Wisconsin loggers and river men. After the Forests had been logged bare, Mason Shoe salesmen peddled shoes and boots door-to-door, all over America. And if the origin of Mason Shoes sounds like an esoteric piece of knowledge to have at my fingertips, it’s only because my grandfather, (toward the end of a life that had already included a handful of years making cartoons for Walt Disney, 30 years of managing the Mormon welfare program in Southern California, and nearly eight decades in service to the Boy Scouts of America), was a Mason Shoe salesman. Mason shoes were sold by part-time sales guys who worked from their homes and sold shoes to their friends and neighbors. We Payne kids all wore Masons because we each got a pair every year around Christmastime. Grandpa’s old Honda Accord has a gold bumper sticker on it that said: “Ask me about Mason Shoes!” Devoutly religious in a suburban California neighborhood, Grandpa stuck a copy of the Book of Mormon inside the box of each pair of shoes he sold – encouraging people to find a walk to walk in their new kicks.

 

My grandfather died just as the millennium turned, in the year 2000. I haven’t thought about Mason shoes in almost twenty years. And I don’t know why the circular wound up in my mailbox.

 

But boy, did it open the lid on a bucketful of memories. Ever happen to you?

 

After all, it’s remarkable how little coaxing a memory needs before it floods your brain as a full-fledged story – bringing back to you a living, breathing part of your life that may have retreated to a foggy corner of the past. 

Financial Literacy


I recently read a newspaper article relating that starting this year a financial literacy course will be a mandatory graduation requirement for students in Florida.  The Florida department of Education sees great benefits in developing this particular kind of literacy in students. Because you know we think highly of all literacies here at Worlds Awaiting, it will come as no surprise that we agree that financial literacy is pretty significant. Again, as with all literacies, financial literacy is something we build over time, which means that we can’t just start with high school graduation. 


It’s clear that we want to see these skills building from early childhood on up. Starting this early to help kids build an understanding of how money works in the world is quite significant, considering research indicates that financial skills are often created by the age of seven. So, if you agree with us and with the folks in Florida, that financial literacy is an important skill for your child’s development, there are lots of ways you can address concepts of financial literacy with your children. 


First, it is recommended that parents help children understand what money is and how it’s used. Here experts suggest that a good place to start building this understanding is for children to earn money so they can make their own spending decisions. Another part of this equation is for children to learn how to save money for larger, more important purchases in a way that allows us to have important conversations about needs versus wants. A piggy bank or a trip to the bank and a savings account in the child’s name is a great way to start a habit of saving. 


The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau also tells adults to consider that whenever and however we use our money, we are teaching children about it. They recommend open and honest communication that allows us to talk with our children firsthand about our own financial goals and expectations. As children watch and listen to you, they will certainly learn from the financial literacy skills you have already developed as an adult. Here at Worlds Awaiting we know it’s these fundamentals that lay the groundwork for children to have a solid foundation of good financial habits and values that will allow them to deal with money in positive ways.


Check out these links for more information about financial literacy:

 

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/local-education/financial-literacy-education-will-now-be-mandatory/nr5ty/

 

http://www.themint.org/index.html

http://www.consumerfinance.gov/money-as-you-grow/

 

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/games-to-teach-financial-literacy-andrew-miller

 

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING


DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.


The Okee Dokee Brothers: Better than Laughing Gas

By Sam Payne

Some months ago, I had to have a tooth filled. Now, I don’t know how your dentist works, but mine has a TV screen on a big arm that he can position right above your face as he works on you. And his assistant comes in and asks you what you want to watch on Netflix. And that, right there – deciding what to watch on Netflix, as the dental assistant hovers with the remote, is the hardest thing about the dental appointment every time. And usually, for me, finally choosing something to watch is kind of a pencil drop. But on the day in question, there in the Netflix lineup was a trio of films from The Okee Dokee Brothers, the Grammy-winning duo made up of Joe Mailander and Justin Lansing. I knew something about these guys, and I’m interested in great music being made for kids, and so I had the dental assistant click on a film called Through The Woods, The Okee Dokee Brothers adventure on the Appalachian Trail, really sort of a video scrapbook of Joe and Justin’s hiking trip along the trail that runs 2,200 miles from Georgia to Maine. And there I was, dentist drilling on my teeth, trying to keep from laughing out loud as Joe and Justin, out on the trail, try to make up a secret handshake. And when they connect with The Wright Kids (a family bluegrass band in Virginia) for a soulful jam on Blue Moon of Kentucky, that was it. I was undone. I had to gesture to the dental assistant to turn it off before I made a fool out of myself or got myself hurt.

Since then, my eleven-year-old son and I have devoured everything we can get our hands on from The Okee Dokee Brothers catalog, including three albums (Through the Woods, Saddle Up, and Can You Canoe), accompanying films about adventures on the Continental Divide, the Mississippi river, and the Appalachian Trail (the films are all available on Netflix), and also their most recent book, a take on the folktale “The Fisherman and his Wife” called “The Thousand Star Hotel” (it comes with an audiobook version on CD, and an album’s worth of songs). It was a delight to have Joe Mailander, one-half of the group, join me in conversation on the show. You can find more from The Okee Dokee Brothers at www.okeedokee.org, and watch for the episode featuring my conversation with Joe at www.byuradio.org.

Expository Text


Today I’d like to tell you about expository text. What is expository text you may ask? Let’s start by saying that the purpose of expository text is to explain something or give information. This kind of text is designed to teach someone something and to give the facts that will inform the reader and help them build new knowledge. Because of these purposes, these texts are always nonfiction. You are probably familiar with different kinds of expository texts since we’ve all interacted with them. Newspapers and magazines, which we often encounter, are great examples of expository texts. Many of you may have used a textbook at one time or another—another clear example of expository text. Because many people equate expository text with dull try textbooks, they react to expository texts with disdain. However, just because a text is expository does not mean that it has to take all the fun out of learning. The very best authors of expository nonfiction for children are able to aptly convey their love of the world to readers. One of my all-time favorite authors of expository nonfiction for kids is Gail Gibbons. Writing on a wide range of topics, from Tornados to Ladybugs, all of Gail’s books engage readers with bold illustrations and lots of factual information. But good authors of expository nonfiction don’t just keep their readers engaged, they also construct their texts to support the reader as they read.  For example, one of the cool things that expository texts do is that they often use textual elements like headings and subheadings to guide a reader thought the text. Additionally, they often use specific structures to convey information such as when they compare and contrast facts, or they outline a problem and then give a solution. One publisher of a number of excellent expository texts for kids that uses all of these support elements is DK. In their books, like the First Dinosaur Encyclopedia, they use headings to organize large amounts of dinosaur information as they compare and contrast the meat-eaters with the plant eaters. For the inquisitive dinosaur fanatic, a book like this is perfect. And it doesn’t have to just be dinosaurs; there are all kinds of things out there that kids are interested in. Expository text may be just the ticket for learning more about the things kids love.

 

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING


Tornados by Gail Gibbons. Holiday House, 2009.

 

Ladybugs by Gail Gibbons. Holiday House, 2012.

 

First Dinosaur Encyclopedia. DK, 2016.

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.

 

Handwriting


As an educator, one of the things that people like to talk to me about is the fact that many schools don’t teach cursive anymore. Personally, the demise of cursive in schools has been of very little importance to me since, though a series of unfortunate events, I never learned how to write in cursive. And even today, the only thing I write with cursive letters is my very crazy signature. Even though I’m personally ambivalent to cursive writing does not mean I still do not advocate for writing by hand. At a recent conference I attended where several children’s book authors presented, I was surprised to find that many of them still do a great deal of their writing by hand. In fact, I realize that I do quite a bit of my own writing with a pen and paper first before I turn to a computer. So, it seems that in the adult world, writing by hand, is still alive and well. But does that mean it should be in our kid’s world? Research seems to indicate that, yes, it should. Studies have shown that writing by hand activates many regions of the brain related to memory and comprehension. Meaning, that we may be able to learn things better when we write them by hand. Other studies show, that particularly for younger children, learning to write by hand is an important part in developing fine motor skills to help them connect the visual parts of the brain with the areas that process language. This finding seems to indicate, that being able to visually decode text, is linked to how we use our motor skills to create letters. But while we can still champion writing by hand, we can’t make this an either/or occurrence; learning to create text fluently with a keyboard is also a significant skill. In fact, research shows that there are correlations between handwriting and keyboarding skills. Instead of focusing on one or the other, it seems more beneficial to focus on helping children develop good written communication skills both by hand and with a computer.

 

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING


Al-Ghabra, I. (2015).  Handwriting: A matter of affairs.  English Language Teaching, 8(10), 168-178.

 

Dinehart, L. H. (2015).  Handwriting in early childhood education: Current research and future implications. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 15(1), 97-118.

 

James, K. H. & Engelhardt, L. (2012).  The effects of handwriting experience on functional brain development in pre-literature children.  Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 1(1), 32-42.

 

Stevenson, N.C. & Just, C. (2014). In early education, why teach handwriting before keyboarding?  Early Childhood Education Journal, 42(1), 49-56.

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.

 

Series Books


As a young girl I could not get enough of Nancy Drew.  I probably read every book published up to that time at least three times. While I had one librarian who frowned upon my constant diet of Drew, luckily I also had parents and teachers who encouraged me—something that I’m very grateful for because I am sure it’s because of this series that I’m a reader today. As I’ve worked with a wide range of readers, I’ve found that series books are often an important part of reading development. Becoming immersed in the adventures of a favorite character or revisiting a stunning world is something that is very comforting for a lot of people. Familiar comfort alone seems reason enough to enjoy books in a series. But research also shows that series are an important part of a young reader’s development. In fact, research has shown that the best readers and writers are often those who read series. This is because reading series books gives them the practice they need to learn how a story works and to get comfortable with literary conventions that govern all literature. Because they have reoccurring patterns, series books also allow readers to build stamina with long texts without having to be derailed by too many new elements. This was certainly my own personal experience. The patterns of Nancy Drew are what helped me focus on the things I struggled with without getting overwhelmed. They showed me that I could get lost in a book, thus helping me to build my reading confidence. With that confidence I progressed on to many other things. Even though I still love a good Nancy Drew story, I have a wide range of reading tastes today because of those first reading experiences. When your child reads books in a series over and over, remember that like all skills, reading takes practice. And, that here at Rachel’s World we believe that sometimes a series is just the right kind of practice.


 By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING


Ward, B.A. & Young, T.A. (2007).  What’s new in Children’s Literature? Engaging readers through series books.  Reading Horizons, 48 (1), 71-80.

 

Ross, C. (1997).  Reading the covers off Nancy Drew:  What readers say about series books.  Emergency Librarian, 24 (5), 19-22.

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.



Burritos and Stories

The Weber Storytelling Festival has been an institution in Ogden, Utah, for more than two decades. Held over three days, just as February becomes March each year, the festival features tellers of all kinds, including 60-70 youth storytellers each year, chosen by their schools and sent to venues like the beautiful Peery’s Egyptian Theater to perform on stages with some of the world’s great storytellers.

 

This year, a couple of us were looking for a great place to have a little lunch during a busy day of storytelling, and Yelp led us to a tiny little restaurant called “Rosa’s Café.” The place smelled terrific, and we said so to the girl behind the register. “That’s all because of my mama’s recipes,” she said, pointing to Mama, who stood at the far end of the counter talking to a customer.

 

At Rosa’s, we were treated to the best burritos we can ever remember eating. They were delicious, colorful, and enormous. And because it took awhile to eat them, we had plenty of time to strike up a conversation with the girl behind the register. Her name was Ida. Ida told us that the family had lived in Ogden for a dozen years or so, and that they had always wanted to have a restaurant together. It was a fantasy they talked about often, the children reminiscing about the wonderful food their mama had always been able to make, even during hard times, from nearly nothing. Now, as adults, they all had jobs in one place or another. But even with their adult lives moving forward, sometimes they allowed themselves to talk about their delicious fantasy (as we talked with Ida, she says to her mama, “Mira, Mami, me estan entrevistando!” “Look, Mom, I’m being interviewed!”).

 

 After all that fantasizing, no one ever thought they’d actually have a restaurant together. But one day, Ida’s father came home and slapped a stack of papers on the kitchen counter. The papers were a contract. Signed. Papa, as a surprise, had gone and made it happen – signed a contract on a little space downtown. They were in. Rosa’s Café was going to be a reality.

 

As you can imagine, Papa was in trouble at first. But it wasn’t long before everyone quit their jobs and took their place at the café (at this moment in our conversation, Ida’s son, maybe nine years old, comes into the restaurant. School is over, and it’s time for a hug and a kiss from mama. He walks behind the counter and gets them both – and then one of each from Grandma).

 

Now, a year and a half after Rosa’s opened its doors, Papa wants to get a bigger place. But he doesn’t want to get in trouble.

 As we talked with Ida and her family, we felt the thrill of apprehension and excitement that must have accompanied the moment Papa put the signed contract on the table. We felt both the weight and the joy of the work that has Ida’s family all together, shoulders to the wheel in the tiny café. And, of course, the family’s story came to us in a wonderful dance that included not only the spoken words of Ida and her family to us in English and Spanish, but also the hugs and kisses and jokes they exchanged with each other, and the smells and tastes of a meal delicious enough to get emotional about (Suzanne Christensen, across the table from me, took her first bite and sighed. “Good?” I asked. “Yes,” she sighed. “And that was just the rice”).

 

We had spent a day-and-a-half telling stories from stage, and would spend another day-an-a-half doing the same thing after lunch at Rosa’s. Our stories were carefully crafted and rehearsed, most of them partly true and partly made up. But a visit to Rosa’s was a reminder of the incredible story that exists behind each shop window, behind each door in each neighborhood, in the home of each family. We felt reverent before that notion. We feel so now.

 

What a delicious lesson to learn at a storytelling festival.

 

Find out more about the Weber Storytelling festival right here: http://www.weber.edu/storytelling


Find out more about Rosa's Café by visiting them on Facebook. Look for "Rosa's Cafe'."


Audio Books


I love taking long car trips. One of the reasons I love car travel is that I can listen to audio books.  In fact, a recent trip that was to take a few hours quickly became a one-day trip when I could not stop listening to the audio version of Kenneth Oppel’s Airborn. Audio books provide a great way for readers of all ages and abilities to connect with stories, and they have a lot of other great benefits.  First and foremost, audio books allow readers to access books they may not be able to read independently. I know of struggling readers who read along with audio books so they can better access the text without feeling overwhelmed.  Audio books help all types of readers build critical listening skills and they provide good models for fluent reading. A great narrator with the ability to read in a fluid and expressive way helps children understand the way words sound and how all the words can flow together in an effortless, connected pattern. Audio books are also a great way to enjoy books together, especially if you feel a little bit less than comfortable reading aloud. Audiobooks are a great way to enjoy togetherness without you having to do the reading. All in all, audio books are a great way to read (and yes it’s still reading even if you listen to it). To start your audio book adventure, I suggest you check out the Odyssey Award for Excellence in Audiobook Production given by the Young Adult Library Services Association, which highlights some of the best audio books for kids out there. To find these and other great audio books, I suggest you check out your local library. Today, libraries often have services where you can download great audio books for free or you can even check out and listen to physical formats as well. So, maybe on your next car trip (or even for a little reading time at home), start discovering the great joys of a book well read.

 

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING

 

AudioBook: Airborn by Kenneth Oppel.  Full Cast Audio, 2006.  

 

Print Book: Airborn by Kenneth Oppel.  HarperCollins, 2005.

 

Odyssey Award for Excellence in Audiobook Production: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/odyssey

 

DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.

 

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