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Winnie the Pooh

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING

As a librarian, I’ve read a lot of books and one of the most exciting things for me is to get to know the story behind the story. This sometimes means reading about what inspired the author, or reading beyond a book to learn more about a person or event in the book. But sometimes, it means getting to know a real story that inspired one of my favorite classics. This is what happened to me recently when I read two books about the real bear that was the inspiration for one of the most iconic characters in children’s literature Winnie-the-Pooh.  Did you know that a soldier in training during World War I named Harry Colebourn bought a bear at a train station? As a veterinarian, Harry knew he could care for the baby bear who he named Winnipeg, after his company’s hometown. Winnie stayed with Harry throughout his training, but when he was shipped off to France he found a good home for Winnie the bear in the London Zoo—and who would encounter that bear there but Christopher Robin! Winnie’s amazing story is told in two picture books: Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh by Sally Walker and illustrated by Jonathan Voss, and Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. Both books tell the story of Harry and Winnie in their own unique way, supported by their own distinctively beautiful pictures. So why not pick up both and learn the story behind the story of the beloved Pooh bear? And that’s a recommendation straight from Rachel’s World.

Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh by Sally Walker and illustrated by Jonathan Voss.  Henry Holt and Co., 2015.

Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall.  Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2015.


DISCLAIMER:

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.


Better Meetings

"Meetings are very much a forum. I think of them as a forum in which business gets conducted. We really make progress by meeting with other people.

We plan meetings up to three months in advance sometimes, to get the most out of them. When we go into these meetings, we know exactly what we need to know. We talk to people before the meeting starts about how they feel about the topic or question in the meeting, that way when we get to the meeting, we know exactly what they think. Then we try to rally everyone around a common answer that everyone will be satisfied with.

The more you plan your meetings, the more effective they will be, and the more people will leave your meetings feeling like something was accomplished."

- Bob Frisch

Listen to the rest of the podcast here

Matt talks with Bob Frisch, who has worked with Senior Executive Teams and Boards on their most vital strategic and organizational challenges. He is considered one of the world’s leading strategic facilitators. Bob is the author of four Harvard Business Review articles and his first book, Who’s In The Room? How Great Leaders Structure and Manage the Teams Around Them, quickly became an Amazon bestseller. He is the founder of the Strategic Offsites Group Company. Bob Frisch shares his article about how to make meetings better.

Join The Matt Townsend Show, Weekdays 9am-12pm ET on BYU RADIO (Sirius XM Channel 143) or byuradio.org.

Traveling to Zion National Park

The world is full of beautiful landscapes, but for me there are few views more jaw dropping than Zion National Park. When you’re down in the canyon the colors jump out at you! Those reds, oranges, and greens…all standing out against the bright blue sky. At the park I’m always looking up which makes me think of other things I look up to. For example: people! Like many, I look up to my parents. Some may look up to their grandparents, a professor, an athlete, chef, author… it could be anyone really!

One of the popular things to do in the park is the hike up to Angel’s Landing. It’s a difficult hike with steep drop-offs and narrow paths. There’s even a chain you have to hold on to at one point! Once you get to the top though the view is reward enough. Now that you’re at the top, you get a different perspective. It made me look back on my own life and reflect on how I got to where I am. What challenges I went through and what shaped me into the person I am today. When I was going through these things it was difficult and I didn’t know why I was going through them. Looking back now though I see why I went through those things, just like the canyon had to endure the pressures of nature to be shaped into the beautiful Zion National Park.

Whatever your reason for visiting the park, you won’t be sorry. I have never been disappointed! I always leave the park a little sore and a little bit more grateful for the people in my life and for who I am- usually with some new self-improvement goals too.

Visit the park and take a moment to think of the people you look up to and to look back on your own life story!

From the desk of Maren Owen, a producer of Traveling with Eric Dowdle on BYU Radio.

Learn more about some of your favorite places with Eric, Wally and Autumn on Traveling with Eric Dowdle. Weekdays 11am-12pm ET except Tuesdays on BYU Radio (Sirius XM Channel 143).

How to Make Decisions Better

"Let's think about two different kinds of aspects of making decisions. So the first is, let's imagine I've got a decision that's hard because it requires a trade-off. Example: You're trying to move to a new apartment, and one of the apartments is really big, the other is kind of small, but it's close to where you work, and the one that's big is far from where you work. So you've got to base your decision of the size of the apartment and the commute." 

Ordinarily, we find those kinds of situations really difficult. And often we'll actually push off the decision because we don't want to deal with it. Or maybe we'll try to find an apartment that's in the middle somewhere. 

What the new research suggests is that if we are not fully invested in a choice, we will not make the best choice. A lot of times people will go and pick the compromised choice, rather than thinking, "Do I need this?" When you make choices dispassionately, then you will not pick the best option for you. When you are truly engaged between both choices, you will think more carefully about the situation, and make a better choice." 

- Dr. Art Markman


Listen to the rest of the podcast at: http://goo.gl/Bd5N8A

Matt talks with Dr. Art Markman, an Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Markman joins the show today to talk about how conflicting goals can make you a better decision maker.

BOOK REVIEW: Tommy: The Gun That Changed America

BOOK REVIEW: Tommy: The Gun That Changed America by Karen Blumenthal. Roaring Brook Press, 2015.

By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING

The Tommy Gun, immortalized by texts and films realizing the gangster and outlaw era of the United States, is known by many but few really understand its whole history. Blumenthal seeks to change this in her accessible “biography” of the guns invention, rise to fame, and its overall influence on the world. John Thompson was determined to create a lightweight gun that could fire fast for use by soldiers on the battlefield. Delays in development prevented his gun from being ready for use during World War I, but its compact size and its ability to spray hundreds of bullets a second made it the favorite weapon for the bootleggers and outlaws for the 20s and 30s. As the weapon of choice for some of the most famous names of the time from Capone to Dillinger the guns infamous history has made it an American icon.

Chronicling both the inventors and purveyors of the gun, Blumenthal clearly shows not only the science behind how the gun was made, but also how it ended up in the hands of criminals. Portraits of the gun itself and of the people making it and using it, bring to life some very interesting historical connections that bring clarity to much of the gun control controversy that still grips the nation today. A fascinating read on its own, the text also has some great classroom extensions including other nonfiction like Blumenthal’s Bootleg and even fiction like Choldenko’s Al Capone Does My Shirts. Readers of all ages will be gripped by this extraordinary book about a familiar object they probably don’t know much about.

Find this and other book reviews at: http://byucbmr.com/


Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2004.

Bootleg: Murder, Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition by Karen Blumenthal. Flash Point, 2011

DISCLAIMER: 

At Worlds Awaiting we discuss a wide range of information aimed at supporting adults who want to build literacy skills in their children.   We understand that there is no “one size fits all” approach when it comes to children’s development, so the information we provide is intended to reach a wide audience. The books and other resources we recommend will also naturally cover a wide range of interests and subject matter that addresses a range of maturity, reading, and comprehension levels.  Since no one understands a child’s needs better than their caretakers, we encourage families to critically select the books and resources that meet their own individual needs and standards.


How to Break Your Addiction to Work

"When you pick up your phone, or answer your email when you are at home, you are indirectly telling your family, "You are not important to me. You do not matter as much as this email/text does."

The first step to breaking your addiction to work is acknowledging that that's not the message you want to be sending to your family. You need to redefine success. Of course you want to do well in your career, and you want your boss to think you're doing a good job, but the research shows at the end of the day, at the end of your life, it's your relationships that matter most. Success is not defined by how much you work, but how well you live your life and balance out your duties."

-Rebecca Knight

Listen to the rest of the podcast at: http://goo.gl/z5ZXXC

Matt talks with Rebecca Knight, a freelance journalist in Boston and a lecturer at Wesleyan University, where she also teaches writing courses. She has written many pieces focused on personal finances and business education. Her work has been published in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Financial Times. For many of us, working simply feels good. But just because it feeds your ego or makes you feel important, that doesn’t mean it’s actually good for you. How do you break the cycle of working long hours at the office and constantly checking email at home? How do you persuade those around you — similarly work-obsessed colleagues or a demanding boss — that working all the time isn’t healthy? Rebecca Knight explains How to Break Your Addiction To Work.

Join The Matt Townsend Show, Weekdays 9am-12pm ET on BYU RADIO (Sirius XM Channel 143) or byuradio.org


Benefits of Media


By Rachel Wadham, Host of WORLDS AWAITING

As a children’s literature specialist I’m all for books, but the truth is that in today’s world you can’t escape the realities of electronic media. The constant stream of media especially around children certainly creates some challenges for adults. Without a doubt there are some valid concerns about children’s engagement with media, but even as we face these challenges it is important to remember that there are some positive aspects about media as well.  Take, for example, the media’s ability to teach children problem solving skills. There is a wide range of children’s educational television shows that allow children to solve hypothetical problems right along with their favorite characters. From everyday problems - like sharing toys with friends and others, dealing with the death of a pet, and seeing characters tackle these problems - can help children develop confidence to solve their own challenges. The benefits can go beyond personal problems as well. For example, one study showed that watching a mathematics based television show led to improved performance for fifth graders in solving all kinds of mathematical problems. The effect is also not limited to television; video games also show some interesting connections to problem solving skills.  Another study found that playing computer games improved fourteen-to-sixteen-year-olds’ performance on computer based educational tasks. So, maybe it’s time for adults to connect to some of the positives of electronic media by building on the problem-solving they portray. As adults, we can take these teachable moments and extend them to the real world by watching or playing together with our own children, and then discuss the concepts and issues encountered afterwards. It could be that a little adult mediated media time may be just the thing children need to make them the critical innovators of tomorrow. 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Children’s Learning from Educational Television: Sesame Street and Beyond by Shalom Fisch.  Routledge, 2004.

Media and Young Children’s Learning: Learning from Educational Media by Heather L. Kirkorian, Ellen Wartella, and Daniel R. Anderson.  Retrieved at: http://www.futureofchildren.org/publications/journals/article/index.xml?journalid=32&articleid=56&sectionid=245

Hall, E. R. (1990). “Television and children’s problem-solving behavior: A synopsis of an evaluation of the effects of “Square One TV” Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 9 (2), 161-74.

Pillay, H. (2003) “An Investigation of Cognitive Processes Engaged in by Recreational Computer Game Players: Implications for Skills of the Future,” Journal of Research on Technology in Education 34, 336–50.

Teach Your Team to Expect Success

"The key to setting a vision is to start the conversation as a leader, and to see from where the people are standing rather than where you're standing. What's their vantage point? What do they see from where their sitting right now? Are you talking about something that is relevant and exciting to them? 

You can get all fired up about the finish line, but until you recognize where your people are at, you won't accomplish anything. You're going to miss the mark. Once you explain your vision to your employees, you have to reinforce it, and often. Don't just plant the seed, water it and let your employees help tend to it. The more you reinforce the vision. the more your people will be trying to accomplish it, even when you're gone." 

- Christina Curtis


Listen to the rest of the podcast at: http://goo.gl/LWKQIb

Matt talks with Christina Curtis, a leader who incorporates research and theoretical applications into her work as a Leadership & Executive Coach. Her experience spans Fortune 500 companies, Olympic Athletes, as well as individuals looking to advance their careers and achieve their goals. Christina writes a blog for Psychology Today, and wrote the article we’re discussing today “teach your team to expect success” published in Harvard Business Review. Expectations play a huge role in success. You may expect success for your business, group or family. But unless they believe it too, you won’t get very far. Christina Curtis explains how to ‘teach your team to expect success’.

Join The Matt Townsend Show, Weekdays 9am-12pm ET on BYU RADIO (Sirius XM Channel 143) or byuradio.org.

The Ambitious Woman

" 'Ambitious' in the dictionary means someone who has a strong desire to succeed, someone who eagerly seeks to succeed. So if you want to be successful, you have to be ambitious. When men are in the corporate world, and they're getting to the top, and they're strong and make decisions, people will say, wow, that's a really ambitious man! Good for him! But then you get a woman that has those same traits, and people say, wow, she's really bossy. She's power-hungry and thinks she's all that. That's the mentality I'm trying to change, and I include several examples of that in my book, The Ambitious Woman." 

Esther Spina 

Listen to the rest of the podcast at: http://goo.gl/G3TxiD

Matt talks with Esther Spina, also known as “The Ambitious Woman”. She has become widely known for her amazing achievements made in the business world. Going from being a beginning employee to a National Consultant for Ambit Energy in just three years, Spina has mastered the art of goal setting. Recently, Spina published a book titled “The Ambitious Woman” and currently heads a mentoring club specifically geared toward helping women to set and achieve effective goals in their lives. A successful business woman and master of her art, Esther Spina joins us today to talk about how her vision of who she wanted to be became her reality.

Join The Matt Townsend Show, Weekdays 9am-12pm ET on BYU RADIO (Sirius XM Channel 143) or byuradio.org

Leslie Odom Jr. - Interview on Top of Mind

Leslie Odom Jr. was as gracious and thoughtful as could be when we sat down to talk last week before his sold-out BRAVO Professional Performing Arts at BYU concerts. He talked about why he walked away from a big TV paycheck to take a risk on Hamilton: An American Musical before anyone knew it would be a hit. He talked about how starring in the show as Aaron Burr, sir, made him at once more patriotic and concerned for our nation. He said Hamilton made him a better husband, friend, person, "and you have to walk toward stuff like that." Now he's walking toward the challenges of solo performance and, having seen the show, I can promise you want to be in the room where it happens. Also, he gives a shout out to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. "Those are not just songs they're singing. That's ministry. It is important work that they (we) do." Listen to the full interview on BYUradio here: goo.gl/K3Gxm4

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